The most read millennial money stories on MoneyLens for 2018 (and why)

The most read millennial money stories on MoneyLens for 2018 (and why)

Louisa shared why she fell in love with renting

Louisa shared why she fell in love with renting

We launched MoneyLens in May 2018 to help other millennials understand their money and embark on the road to becoming better at managing it.

In the seven months from going live, the team (we’re a group of young professionals at a FTSE 100 investment company) have written and published a huge variety of articles on investing, budgeting and all things financial.

For a snapshot of some of the people involved, take a look at our a bit about us page. We believe money matters aren’t as intimidating as they first seem when you take out the acronyms and scary jargon.

And it seems we’re on the right track, because tens of thousands of people have read pieces where we’ve shared our own experiences or provided information in a jargon-free way.

Is there a financial topic you’d like explained in a nutshell? Or a term you’ve come across that you don’t understand? Get in touch. We’d love to hear from you!

In the mean time, here’s our most read stories of 2018 to get you started…

The 10 most read stories of 2018

1.       A quick and dirty guide to the financial goals millennials should (and shouldn’t) worry about

 

Andrew Lacey, a millennial investment specialist, gives us his view on what you should and shouldn’t worry about. Andrew’s tackled the fact that many would-be investors don’t know where to start head-on here.

 

2.       Why your first 10 years of saving could be more powerful than the next 40 combined

 

MoneyLens editor Vicki Owen explains why, for most people, their twenties is the most important decade to save into a pension. Why? Compound interest, the so-called “eighth wonder of the world”.

 

3.       Why age-old financial advice needs updating for millennials

 

Maggie Sullivan, one of our New York-based money writers, asks how millennials finances look today compared to in the past. She believes financial advice needs to shift.

 

4.       Why I fell in love with renting

 

Corporate responsibility executive Louisa takes a positive view on renting in London. The average age of a first-time buyer is now 31, up from 23 in the Sixties. Louisa doesn’t care about the stats.

 

5.       Sharing the gain and the pain: managing finances as a couple

MoneyLens editor Vicki Owen explores the tricky question of how to organise your finances in a way that is likely to lead to the least discord. If you’re ready to think about sharing some of the ins and outs of household finances, here are six key steps to consider.

6.       Shares vs property: where do I invest?

 

Vicki Owen considers whether people could be better off putting money in property or shares. There are some basic rules and facts that can guide your decision.

 

7.       Why I chose not to go to uni: £40k debt is just part of the answer

 

Sofia Mumtaz, a trainee on the Investment2020 scheme, shares why, although both of her parents and all of her classmates have gone to university, she chose not to.

 

8.       What happened in 2008? Explaining the financial crisis

 

Ten years on, MoneyLens’ Maggie Sullivan asked a millennial economist to explain the financial crisis.

 

9.       10 books that will change the way you think about personal finance

 

Financial planner Lottie Leefe picks out 10 books that could have a positive impact on the way you view your finances.

 

10.   What my grandparents taught me about saving and investing

 

When Maggie Sullivan turned 16 her grandfather gave her $1,000 (about £760) and took her to his financial planner to learn the basics of investing and financial markets.

 

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